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Survey Corner and Line Marking Options

Corner Marking

Survey corners normally mark the endpoints of the property lines, and the intersection of the property lines with right-of-ways and easements. Corners may also be set on the banks of rivers and lakes and swamps when the actual corner location is inaccessible. The location of the corners will be displayed on the survey and will be represented by a symbol noting the type of object occupying the corner location. Survey Corners that are found and deemed to be in the correct position may or may not be replaced, depending on the needs of the client and the historical significance of the actual found item. Survey corners are typically set flush with the ground. At May & Associates, Inc. we can help you decide the best type of corner to mark you property that meets your individual needs.

Standard Corner
The standard survey corner is a ½”x18” rebar with a plastic survey cap. The survey cap contains markings that identify the survey both by initials, or by name and includes the license number of the surveyor. The standard survey corner is referenced in Act 132, the certified survey act

Standard Survey Cap

Anchored Corner
The anchored survey corner is a metal rod with additional metal stakes that curve into and grip the soil, much like tree roots. It is very resistant to removal and normally requires digging a large hole to remove. It is topped with a metal disk noting the name and licensed number of the licensed surveyor. The anchored corner cost more per corner but is very well suited when you suspect a pesky neighbor may be tempted to remove or relocate a corner after the survey is completed.

Anchored survey corner

The cap of an anchored survey corner is a larger metal survey cap containing a bit more information. The anchored survey corner cap we use at May & Associates looks like this

Anchored Survey Cap

Concrete Monument
Concrete monuments are 4” diameter X 36” long and have a metal rerod running the length of the monument. Concrete monuments are most commonly set in the course of creating subdivision at major deflection and intersection points like the beginning and end points of curves along roads. Concrete monuments may be set on property surveys, and are more resistant to removal. Typically concrete monuments are uncapped.

Auxiliary Marking Posts

Auxiliary marking posts are generally set next to survey corners to help in preserving their location. Since survey corners are set flush with the ground, weeds, leaves and other vegetation will eventually cover them making finding them difficult after a few years.

Standard Lath
The standard lath is 5/8” thick x 4 foot long oak stake set next to the survey corner to aid in finding the corner point. It is the most common survey stake seen. It is commonly mistaken for the survey corner since most are unaware that the survey corner is set flush with the ground. Pink survey ribbon is tied around the top of the lath to aid in its visibility. The standard lath, if left alone will eventually succumb to deterioration after about a year, depending on its exposure to the weather. The standard lath is best used for a temporary aid in locating the survey corner.

Standard Corner with a lath

T-Post
A “T-post” is a metal fence post, approximately 5 foot long that is set next to the survey corner to aid in finding the corner point. Like the standard lath, it is commonly mistaken for the survey corner since it is readily visible. Being constructed of metal, it will last for years. T-posts are well suited for forested environments where aesthetics are not an issue.

Typical T-Post

Vinyl Lot Stake
The vinyl lot stake is a white 3/4” thick x 18” stake set next to the survey point to aid in finding the corner point. Being of vinyl construction, it is pleasing visually and is well suited for residential environments.

Line Marking

Additional stakes may be set in aid of identifying the location along the property lines. The distance between stakes is dependent of the needs of the client and the topography of the land. Stakes can be set over the entire length or just part of the lines. Also depending on the specific needs of the client, the line may be cleared of brush so the line markings are visible directly down the property line.

Standard Lath
The standard lath is 5/8” thick x 4 foot long oak stake set directly on the property line. The upper portion of the lath is typically painted Pink to aid in its visibility. The standard lath, if left alone will eventually succumb to deterioration after about a year, depending on its exposure to the weather. The standard lath is best used for a temporary aid in marking the line.

T-Post
A “T-post” is a metal fence post, approximately 5 foot long that is set directly on the property line. Being constructed of metal, it will last for years. T-posts are well suited for forested environments where aesthetics are not an issue.

Additional Reference Irons
Additional reference irons may be set along the lines at the request of the client. They are generally set in addition to the standard lath along the lines when there is a risk of the line stake being removed or moved by a pesky neighbor. They are uncapped, and set just under the surface of the ground. They are not meant to be visible, but aid in locating the line later with a metal detector.